Computing

“A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science, and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

Primary National Curriculum for Computing, 2014

 

COMPUTING CURRICULUM STATEMENT

Through our computing curriculum we aim to give our pupils the life-skills that will enable them to embrace and utilise new technology in a socially responsible and safe way. We want our pupils to be able to operate in the 21st century workplace and we want them to know the career opportunities that will be open to them if they study computing. We want children to become autonomous, independent users of computing technologies, gaining confidence and enjoyment from their activities. We want the use of technology to support learning across the entire curriculum and to ensure that our curriculum is accessible to every child. Not only do we want them to be digitally literate and competent users of technology but through our computing lessons we want them to develop creativity, resilience and problem solving skills by learning how to be ‘computational thinkers’. We want our pupils to have a breadth of experience to develop their understanding of themselves as individuals within their community but also as members of a wider global community and as responsible digital citizens.

OUR CURRICULUM INTENT FOR COMPUTING

  • Provide a broad, balanced, challenging and enjoyable curriculum for all pupils.
  • Develop pupil’s computational thinking skills that will benefit them throughout their lives.
  • Meet the requirements of the national curriculum programmes of study for computing at Key Stage 1 and 2
  • To respond to new developments in technology
  • To equip pupils with the confidence and skills to use digital tools and technologies throughout their lives.
  • To enhance and enrich learning in other areas of the curriculum using IT and computing.
  • To develop the understanding of how to use computers and digital tools safely and responsibly

The National Curriculum for Computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles of computer science, including logic, algorithms, data representation, and communication
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems.
  • are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

HOW WE IMPLEMENT OUR INTENTIONS

EYFS (Pearl Class - Reception)                                                                                                                      It is important in the early years foundation stage to give children a broad, play-based experience of IT and computing in a range of contexts, including off-computer activities and outdoor play.

Computing is not just about computers. Early years learning environments should feature IT scenarios based on experience in the real world, such as in role play. Children gain confidence, control and language skills through opportunities such as ‘programming’ each other using directional language to find toys/objects, creating artwork using digital drawing tools and controlling programmable toys. Children may also be introduced to basic keyboard and mouse skills through directed activities.

Outdoor exploration is an important aspect and using digital recording devices such as video recorders, cameras, microphones and tablets can support children in developing communication skills. This is particularly beneficial for children who have English as an additional language.

Key Stage 1  (Ruby Class - Year 1 & 2)                                                                                                          At Alfriston Primary School, we follow the National Centre for Computing Excellence (NCCE) Teach Computing curriculum in line with National Curriculum for Computing expectations.

By the end of Key Stage 1, children will be taught to:

  • understand what algorithms are, how they are implemented as programs on digital devices, and that programs execute by following a sequence of instructions
  • write and test simple programs
  • use logical reasoning to predict and computing the behaviour of simple programs
  • organise, store, manipulate and retrieve data in a range of digital formats
  • communicate safely and respectfully online, keeping personal information private, and recognise common uses of information technology beyond school.

Key Stage 2 (Sapphire and Emerald Class - Year 3 to 6)                                                                             At Alfriston Primary School, we follow the National Centre for Computing Excellence (NCCE) Teach Computing curriculum in line with National Curriculum for Computing expectations.

By the end of Key Stage 2, children will be taught to:

  • design and write programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
  • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output; generate appropriate inputs and predicted outputs to test programs
  • use logical reasoning to explain how a simple algorithm works and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  • understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world-wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration
  • describe how internet search engines find and store data; use search engines effectively; be discerning in evaluating digital content; respect individuals and intellectual property; use technology responsibly, securely and safely
  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information.